Bouddhisme et politique font-ils bon ménage ?

Buddhist monks who are supporters of the CNRP react as party leader Sam Rainsy announces the result of a meeting with Cambodian PM Hun Sen in Phnom Penh

Un post en français, une fois n’est pas coutume :-).

Pour répondre à cette question, j’ai travaillé à partir de pas mal de références, notamment de vulgarisation (voir en fin d’article), mais celle qui m’a le plus interrogée et poussée à réféchir aux rapports entre bouddhisme et politique est L’enseignement du Bouddha, de Walpola Rahula, publié en français en 1961 sous l’égide du Collège de France. Continue reading “Bouddhisme et politique font-ils bon ménage ?”

Why I’ll never own an iPhone – at least not this year

Iphone addiction comicIt’s already hard getting away from my newly acquired MBP (Macbook Pro – I didn’t know what it meant last month too don’t worry ;-)), but just imagine if I owned an iPhone:

  • Kids – oh, I have kids?
  • Sex – yes, I do remember something about that in biology class 15 years ago…
  • Social life – well, I do have tons of friends (on Facebook), fans (on Twitter) and colleagues (on Linkedin), ok that doesn’t count then 🙁
  • Books – isn’t that what computers used to be called before?
  • and the list goes on…

Continue reading “Why I’ll never own an iPhone – at least not this year”

2010 UK Elections, TV and Twitter: how it doesn’t always fit together

“Who wants to be a Prime Minister?”

I was almost going to call this post “Who wants to be a Prime Minister” but refrained at the last minute (lucky you!). A colleague today told me that during the TV debates, the three British candidates in the run-up to 6 May 2010 were being evaluated by the audience in the studio with remote voting systems, and that the results were being displayed on TV screens. Continue reading “2010 UK Elections, TV and Twitter: how it doesn’t always fit together”

Volcanic ash clouds, crisis and progress: why the Single European Sky will not be built in a day

Air traffic in Europe in 24h

Following the massive disruption of air traffic in Europe last week, caused by a volcanic ash cloud, I was happily surprised  to see so many newspapers and politicians put the Single European Sky  on the table.

And my first thought was: why does it always take a crisis for things to move ahead faster and get done? And will that actually be the case with European skies? Continue reading “Volcanic ash clouds, crisis and progress: why the Single European Sky will not be built in a day”